XVS1100 Rear Shock Replacement

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XVS1100 Rear Shock Replacement

Post  Ewok1958 on Tue 07 Jun 2016, 2:58 pm

Well, the custom made Wilbers shock for the XVS1100 arrived in the post today (from Ireland, made in Germany).  Replacing the rear spring/shock combo on the Bandit was pretty straight forward (and #Tag was a great help). But doing the same with this new Wilbers on the XVS1100 looks to be much more complicated. Shed day tomorrow!



I have a workshop manual and found this useful-looking info on a US forum thread:

Removing the Rear Shock / Spring Assembly
 
You can remove the rear shock by using a motorcycle lift (found at Sears, HarborFreight or Sam's for ~$90.00) and lifting the bike just so the rear tire is resting on the surface. I've found the easiest way to get those jacks under the bike is to use two 2x10 sections of wood under the tires. Roll it up on the wood sections first. Put 2 - 2x4's under the kick stand.

Carefully roll the jack under the bike towards the front of the frame as you can get. Strap the bike to the jack. Carefully lift the bike so that the back tire just rests on the board. Take the seat off, remove the plastic seat pan, take out the rev limiter and wiring and the fuel filter. You may also find it easier to remove the tank, but I don't think it's needed.

Next working from the left side of the bike, take off the chrome side cover and the tool box cover. Remove the AIS assy and pull the plastic (tool box and transfer case) cover out.

This makes everything easily accessible. First you'll want to remove the dog bone bolts. First the lower. This is where you'll need to find the pressure balance point with the jack. Loosen the bolt, and use the jack up and down to find the spot that will take pressure off the bolt and free it up. Once the lower dog bone bolt is free, work on the lower shock / relay arm bolt. Same technique to find the free point for the bolt (move the jack up and down). Take the top bolt out and remove the shock through the seat pan area.

This is by far the easiest way to remove the shock. Taking the back wheel off is an alternative way, but it involves more weight management in that the bike is prone to be way off balance and you need to deal with a heavy back wheel assy. The seat pan path is much easier.  -- Advice from Jeff Leitner - BakerBrackets
 
--Response from JimHartman1
 
Hey Jeff,

Thanks for the procedure and advice. All went well. Spring is installed, bike put back together and just waiting for the rain to stop to check it out.

The instructions were great. Any questions beforehand became answered while working through the disassembly. All became quite intuitive. The only thing I would add is that it was extremely helpful to have the Clymer service manual because of pictures and disassembly instructions. Specifically, it showers detail as to where the bolts are that need to be removed. It also provides schematics of the swing arm assembly, which I found very helpful. I followed your instructions and chose only those additional steps in the book to support your procedure. Following the Clymer steps would have resulted in taking too much stuff off.

Removal of the tool box panel would have been tough without the Clymer book. There is a bolt in the battery box that has to be removed before the tool box can be removed. Also, the battery box must be either removed or loosened enough to back the shock top bolt out far enough to remove the shock. All in all, it was a relatively easy process. Time consuming, though, for me because this was the first motorcycle disassembly I’ve ever attempted.

I spent almost as much time getting the bike up on the stand. I came up with an adapter (2 X 4‘s) to fit between the jack and the frame. The PepBoys jack was just a little small, but the 2 X 4 adapter eliminated any metal to metal contact and seems like it will be just fine. Also, I worked out a safety net by installing large eye-hooks in the ceiling rafters and hooking two tie-downs to the handle bars and one to the sissy bar. This kept all stabilizing straps out of the way, which gave practically un-restricted access to the work area

Finally, I went to three suspension shops and they all looked at the shock/spring and their eyes got big. None said that they could do it. So I took it to the Yamaha dealer and he did it in ten minutes. Charged $28.00. That was fine. I was just ready to get it back on before I forgot where everything went!
 
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Ewok1958

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Re: XVS1100 Rear Shock Replacement

Post  #Tag on Fri 10 Jun 2016, 8:48 pm

Centrestands are great things, aren't they.
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Re: XVS1100 Rear Shock Replacement

Post  reddog on Fri 10 Jun 2016, 9:24 pm

Couldn't agree more. Until the nut rattles off and the bike kicks sideways next time you are refueling on the centre stand. That's what happened to me around a year ago when on an overnight bike trip. Do you reckon anyone had the right pitch nut in wood woop?
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Re: XVS1100 Rear Shock Replacement

Post  Ewok1958 on Fri 10 Jun 2016, 11:28 pm

Hmm, haven't even gotten started yet.  Need Bev around to stabilise the bike while I get the lifter centered. Might be a delay of a few weeks as we're off caravanning next week.  As 10CC said "the things you do for love"! cheers
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Re: XVS1100 Rear Shock Replacement

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